I need a cigarette

Perseverance stuck her landing on Mars. Watching the livestream was the most fun and excitement I’ve had in a while. I need a cigarette now. 🙂


I’ve linked to it before, but I’ll link to it again as a part of a “double album” of two well-worth-reading writeups on member-supported work:

I’ve gone on record in the past as being down on consulting + patreon business model, but I should probably refine that to pure consulting + patreon = iffy but weird expertise + community = worth exploring[1]. I’ve said before: there are forms of expertise that insufficiently few clients will pay consulting rates to access but plenty of your peers will pay individually small but collectively significant prices to access, and you can build a business[2] on that kind of expertise!
While consulting is an excellent business model for monetizing expertise, it’s not the only one, and I suspect that some of the more baroque, offbeat forms of expertise <clears throat, looks awkardly around the room> are going to have to consider alternative or hybrid monetization models.
One of the things I heard myself say[3] in the most recent TEI Talk is: “X is so cheap you may as well do it. But X being so cheap is also one of the reasons why there’s so much garbage on the Internet, so be wary of doing X just because it’s cheap.”
Part of what a community can do is add cost to interactions, and by so doing multiply their value.
That’s worth exploring.
-P


Athletes or musicians can attend workshops to help them develop certain skills. Attorneys and physicians have continuing education. We’ve got an Indie Experts workshop on point of view beginning March 11. It will help you recognize, refine, or amplify your points of view. Use the discount code b1341192fea064ec03274a46f9e16b2e to get the 30% early bird discount when you register for the workshop: https://indieexperts.io/workshops/point-of-view-workshop/


Notes
1: I almost always use the word “weird” in a neutral or positive way.
2: When I think about “forms of expertise that insufficiently few clients will pay consulting rates to access but plenty of your peers will pay individually small but collectively significant prices to access”, two examples come readily to mind: https://gomakethings.com/ and https://www.pyimagesearch.com/
3: I say “heard myself say” because sometimes when giving a talk there’s this odd floating-outside-yourself experience that happens as you take a risk with expressing an idea and it careens into somewhat new territory, surprising me just as much as it might surprise the audience. James Poniewozik once wrote about Sarah Cooper and Donald Trump: “From Ms. Cooper’s lips, the president’s sentences become plywood bridges he’s trying to nail together, one shaky plank at a time, over a vertiginous Looney Tunes canyon.” (source: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/27/arts/television/trump-sarah-cooper.html). This is one of the most beautifully true things about Trump’s oratory style, but it’s also true-ish of the experience of expressing still-embryonic ideas in a talk, and that moment when you decide to take a risk with the expression of those ideas. Or rather, the risk happens and the floating-outside-yourself-you looks on with bemused wonder and dismay… or delight, depending on how the plywood-bridge-expression of the idea idea holds together.