Authorities micro-study, pt2

All the authorities.

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Continuing on from https://philipmorganconsulting.com/indie-experts-list/indie-experts-authorities-micro-study-pt1!

Here’s the list of authorities by topic. I pretty liberally normalized the list of topics to make navigating this list easier, and to perhaps make it more useful as a “dictionary” of authorities. Apologies for fuzzing out some of the fidelity in the list of topics, but fear not, I will link you to the full source data later.

  • Blogging
    • Tim Denning
  • Business
    • Alex Hillman
    • Brian Casel
    • Chris Do
    • Dave Snowden
    • David Baker
    • Doug Hubbard
    • Jason Fried
    • John Cutler
    • Kim Scott
    • Paul Jarvis
    • Perry Marshall
    • Peter Drucker
    • Richard Koch
    • Roger Martin
    • Sean D’Souza
    • Seth Godin
    • Simon Sinek
    • Simon Wardley
    • Thoughtbot
    • Yvon Chouinard
  • Coaching
    • Steve Chandler
    • Tony Robbins
  • Consulting
    • Alan Weiss
    • Blair Enns
    • Brennan Dunn
    • Jonathan Stark
    • Philip Morgan
    • Rochelle Moulton
  • Copywriting
    • Joanna Wiebe
  • Customer experience
    • Matt Watkinson
  • DevOps
    • Gene Kim
    • Jez Humble
    • Nicole Forsgren
    • Simon Wardley
    • Yan Cui
  • E-commerce
    • Ezra Firestone
    • Kurt Elster
    • Steve Chou
  • Email Marketing
    • Alex Berman
    • Andre Chaperon
    • Ben Settle
    • Brennan Dunn
    • Dorie Clark
    • Litmus
    • Meera Kothand
    • Val Geisler
  • Expertise
    • David Baker
    • Philip Morgan
  • Fitness
    • David Sinclair
    • Pavel Tsatsouline
    • Peter Attia
  • Freelancing
    • Brennan Dunn
  • Knowledge Work
    • Cal Newport
  • Laravel Framework
    • Taylor Otwell
  • Linux kernel development
    • Linus Torvalds
  • Marketing
    • Bill Bice
    • Catherine Howell
    • Claire Suellentrop
    • Dave Trott
    • Donald Miller
    • Gia Laudi
    • Jason Leister
    • Jay Abraham
    • Kai Davis
    • Malcolm Gladwell
    • Mark Ritson
    • Neil Patel
    • Perry Marshall
    • Philip Morgan
    • Rand Fishkin
    • Robert Cialdini
    • Ross Hudgens
    • Russell Brunson
    • Sean D’Souza
    • Seth Godin
    • Steve Gordon
  • Not provided
    • Brian Love
    • Dan Kennedy
    • David Baker
    • James Clear
    • Jay Abraham
    • Kai Davis
    • Ken McCarthy
    • Rochelle Moulton
    • Thomas Burleson
    • Tim Ferris
  • Personal Development
    • Dan Pink
    • Davidji
    • James Clear
    • Leo Babauta
    • Marie Foleo
    • Matt D’Avela
    • Matt Sandrini
    • Maxwell Maltz
    • Naval Ravikant
    • Pema Chodron
    • Will Sentance
  • Personal Finance
    • Pete Matthew
  • Piping engineering
    • Tony Paulin
  • Positioning
    • Jonathan Stark
    • Philip Morgan
  • Pricing
    • Blair Enns
    • Chris Do
    • Jonathan Stark
    • Patrick Brennan
    • Phil Barden
    • Ron Baker
  • Programming training
    • Jeffrey way
  • Project management
    • Eli Goldratt
  • Research
    • Erika Hall
    • Indi Young
  • Research thought leadership
    • Randi Korn
  • SaaS
    • Amy Hoy
    • Brennan Dunn
    • Dan Martell
    • Nathan Barry
    • Patrick MacKenzie
  • Sales
    • Blair Enns
    • Heather Morgan
    • Jill Konrath
    • Liston Witherill
    • Louis Nicholls
    • Neil Rackem
  • Self Development
    • James Clear
    • Ryan Holiday
  • SEO
    • Brendan Hufford
  • Social Media
    • Gary Vaynerchuk
  • Software architecture
    • Jeff Nickoloff
    • Stephen Kuenzli
  • Software Development
    • Avdi Grimm
    • Corey Quinn
    • Don Reinertsen
    • Dries Buyteart
    • Jacob Beningo
    • Jeff Sutherland
    • Jim Coplien
    • Joel Spolsky
    • Kent Dodds
    • Martin Fowler
    • Michael Drues
    • Paul Akers
    • Ryan Singer
    • Sandi Metz
    • Scott Cantor
  • Startups
    • Nathan Barry
    • Paul Graham
    • Rachel Rogers
    • Y Combinator
  • Structural racism and bias
    • Ibram Kendi
  • Thought Leadership
    • Bob Lalasz
  • Training
    • Amy Porterfield
  • UX
    • Jared Spool
  • Vue.js Framework
    • Evan You

Hell of a list, eh?!

Again, my normalization did some violence to the nuance that’s actually there. You’ll see that nuance if you inspect the underlying data, which I’ll unleash in tomorrow’s email (I just need a bit more time to dump it into a new spreadsheet that isn’t cluttered with all my scratch tabs and experimental pivot tables).

That’s the topical grouping.

What if I group the authorities by business type?

I won’t lengthen this email with an un-necessary copy/paste of that view of things. Instead, I’ll simply say: it feels like looking for faces in clouds. There might be a pattern there, but I doubt it.

I don’t think that businesses that are just starting out (vs. stable or growing businesses) have a “special” set of authorities they pay particular attention to. I don’t think that creative business (vs. IT or consulting) have a “special” set of authorities they pay particular attention to.

As I say this, I’m going on gut feel + a data set that has 41 more data points that you probably do, and I’m not using sophisticated statistical analysis. I don’t think that diminishes the strength of my conclusions at all.

The strongest relationship in this data is between topic and authority. That means if you look at the topic of pricing, for example, a few names keep coming up. Jonathan Stark, Blair Enns, etc. That suggests (but by no means guarantees) that if we sampled 100 or 1,000 people similar to those I sampled here, the same set of names would keep surfacing as authorities on pricing.

This is the essence of uncertainty reduction. We’re not certain about this trend, but thanks to my little scrappy micro-study, we’re less uncertain about it.

Based on looking at this data, if we sampled 1,000 people working at creative agencies and asked them who are their authorities on the topic of pricing, and then sampled 1,000 people from consultancies using the same question, and then we compared the two lists of authorities, I think those lists would look very similar. That’s what I mean when I say that based on this data, I don’t think that creative business (vs. IT or consulting) have a “special” set of authorities they pay particular attention to.

The evergreen caveat with these micro-studies is, as always: My data comes from my email list, which is a niche sample population (my email list is definitely not a mass-appeal list). It’s inherently biased data, collected with convenience opt-in sampling. We certainly might get different results with a less biased sample. We’d also never get that sample because of the expense and difficulty of more rigorous methods. So bask in the glow of uncertainty reduction, my friends! Imperfect as it may be, bask. in that. glow!!

Tomorrow, I’ll go out on several conceptual limbs as I attempt to conclude this report to you.

-P