David Byrne on email marketing

Sometimes I think Talking Heads’ “Psycho Killer” is the email marketing theme song.positioning services - Experiential marketing learning for independent consultantsYou start a conversation, you can’t even finish itYou’re talking a lot, but you’re not saying anythingThis is the part that’s talking about ineffective email marketing.This part reminds me of email marketing that only exists to make a sale. Email marketing that shows up when someone wants to launch something, then disappears until they next time they want to shake the piggybank. Email marketing that doesn’t connect, inspire, illuminate, or at least entertain. Email marketing that’s like your friend who wants to show up for you suspiciously close to the time they need your help moving that sofa with a hideaway bed or that oak partner desk or something.When I have nothing to say, my lips are sealedThis is the part of the song that’s talking about folks who set the bar too high for sending.They think that email marketing has to be perfect. Has to be an immaculate, lengthy deposit of timeless wisdom. It certainly can be that, but it doesn’t have to be. It can be anything that delivers ROI on the time it takes to read it. (hat tip to Jonathan Stark for framing it this way for me)Say something once, why say it again?Finally, David Byrne is reminding us here of the first rule of email marketing: never ask for something just once.Repetition has an important role in email marketing. Never ask for something just once, no matter what it is. Repeat the ask; repeat the offer; repeat the lesson you’re trying to teach.This is a good place to remind you, if you’re trying to change your business so you can get paid for advice, my private coaching may be of interest.-P

Two online experiential learning workshops this October: