Funerals, cremations, VINDICATION

(Readin’ time: 1m 38s)

OK, I thought my ideas, presented here, on ways the funeral business could close the “cremation gap”, were a little far out there, but turns out… not so far out there after all!

Witness: www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/the-funeral-as-we-know-it-is-becoming-a-relic–just-in-time-for-a-death-boom/2019/04/14/a49003c4-50c2-11e9-8d28-f5149e5a2fda_story.html

A quote:


More than half of all American deaths lead to cremations, compared to 28 percent in 2002, due to expense (they can cost a third the price of a burial), the environment, and family members living far apart with less ability to visit cemetery plots, according to the National Funeral Directors Association. By 2035, the cremation rate is projected to be a staggering 80 percent, the association says. And cremation frees loved ones to stage a memorial anywhere, at any time, and to store or scatter ashes as they please. (Maintenance of cemeteries, if families stop using them, may become a preservation and financial problem.)

Past funeral association president Mark Musgrove, who runs a network of funeral homes and chapels in Eugene, Ore., says his industry, already marked by consolidation, is adapting to changing demands.

“Services are more life-centered, around the person’s personality, likes and dislikes. They’re unique and not standardized,” he says. “The only way we can survive is to provide the services that families find meaningful.”

Funeral homes have hired event planners, remodeled drab parlors to include dance floors and lounge areas, acquired liquor licenses to replace the traditional vat of industrial-strength coffee. In Oregon, where cremation rates are near 80 percent, Musgrove has organized memorial celebrations at golf courses and Autzen Stadium, home of the Ducks. He sells urns that resemble giant golf balls and styles adorned with the University of Oregon logo. In a cemetery, his firm installed a “Peace Columbarium,” a retrofitted 1970s VW van, brightly painted with “Peace” and “Love,” to house urns.


So my ideas maybe weren’t that far out after all!!

Every industry undergoes change.

You–very likely a software developer or someone in the tech industry–eat change for breakfast.

That positions you very well to charge clients to help them navigate change through better planning or risk mitigation.

How could your services do more of that? It’s really profitable stuff.

-P